Air Purifiers Attributes Explanations

Here are Air Purifiers attributes explanations which you may found in our comparisons:

Clean Air Delivery Rate: Tobacco Smoke (CFM) – The CADR indicates the volume of filtered air that a purifier can handle. The higher the tobacco smoke number, the faster the unit filters smoke from the air.

Clean Air Delivery Rate: Dust (CFM) – The CADR indicates the volume of filtered air that a purifier can handle. The higher the dust number, the faster the unit filters dust from the air.

Clean Air Delivery Rate: Pollen (CFM) – The CADR indicates the volume of filtered air that a purifier can handle. The higher the pollen number, the faster the unit filters pollen from the air.

Adjusted Area Coverage (sq. ft.) – Our adjusted area coverage is based on the square footage in which the filter can accomplish four air changes per hour. If you double the square footage, just halve the air changes per hour.

Noise Level at Highest Speed (dBA) – The operation volume is measured in decibels (dBA). Lower decibels mean a quieter purifier.

Noise Level at Lowest Speed (dBA) – The operation volume is measured in decibels (dBA). Lower decibels mean a quieter purifier.

Airflow at Highest Fan Speed(CFM) – This is the volume of air that travels through the purifier at its highest speed, measured in cubic feet per minute (CFM).

A number of Cleaning Cycles – This is the number of filters and technological components that clean dirty air as it passes through the air purifier.

Room Size – Based on the unit’s area coverage, we determine if this air purifier is best for a small, medium or large room.

We defined a small room as 350 square feet or less, a medium room as between 350 and 500 square feet and a large room as 500 square feet and above.

Ionizer – An Ionizer charges particles as they pass. Then, on a second pass, the filter captures these negatively charged particles.

We list whether the ionizer is always on, optional or not available. It is important to note that charged particles can harm your lungs, especially if you have breathing-related issues.

UV Bulb – A UV bulb utilizes ultraviolet radiation to burn particles in the air. We list whether the UV lamp is always on, optional or not available.

It is important to note that the effectiveness of UV light purification in air purifiers is debatable.

HEPA Filter – A filter type that is certified to clean 99.97% of allergens from the air as small as 0.3 microns in size.

Filter Reset – The purifier has a button that allows you to reset the filter monitor, whether or not you’ve changed the filter.

Speed Control – There are different air speeds on the unit.

Pre-Filter – The pre-filter is usually a carbon-based filter that catches large particles and odors before the air reaches the primary filter.

Energy Star Verification – The air purifier is certified by the Environmental Protection Agency as being energy efficient.

CARB Certified – The California Air Resource Board measures the ozone output of air purifiers. All CARB-certified purifiers produce little or no ozone during operation.

Average Power Consumption (Watts) – This shows the average amount of energy used during operation.

Filter Monitor – The air purifier monitors the effectiveness of your filters and notifies you when it is time to change or clean the filters.

Standby Mode – After the air purifier runs, it will enter a low-power standby mode.

Auto Mode – You can program the unit to run without your input on individual settings.

Air Quality Sensor – The air purifier comes with a sensor that measures air pollutants and automatically adjusts the fan speed accordingly.

Operation Timer & Scheduler – You can set how often and for how long the air purifier will run.

Remote Control – The air purifier comes with a remote control.